winefinedarkchicks
I am not superwoman. My mother is not superwoman. My mother’s mother is not superwoman. I am, we are, soft. Can shatter. Crumble in your hands. Our survival does not mean we prosper. We are like other women but unlike them. So do not tell us we can handle anything. We only seem like superwoman, a figment of your imagination, because you have forced our lives to be perpetual labor with only seconds of relief. If we carry the world on our shoulders and the children on our backs, what are we but your glorified mules slapped with guilt praises of perseverance and strength. Our bones and our blood and our sweat have built the wealth of nations. Our burial should not be the first time we rest.
Yasmin Mohamed Yonis (via ethiopienne)
black-culture

5centsapound:

Hank Willis Thomas: History Doesn’t Laugh (2014, South Africa)

Conceptual artist Hank Willis Thomas uses photography to explore issues of identity, history, race, and class. For this series,  photo-derived sculptures have been cast in aluminum, silicone and bronze to reframe the original historical image by focusing on the impact of hand gestures. 

read an interview with the artist via okayafrica

1-2. Raise Up

3. Victory is Certain

4. History Doesn’t Laugh

5. Die Dompas Moet Brand ! (The Passbook must Burn!)

6. Peace and  Freedom

7. An injury to one is and an injury to all, 

8 - 9. A Luta Continua

1gent

1gent:

eastafricaart:

Notes from Ed Cross Fine Art

Cyrus Kabiru is one of the most exciting of the younger artists to have emerged from Nairobi over the last few years. Kabiru has just completed his first international exhibition at Kuntspodium T Gallery in Tilburg, Holland which included an installation of his signature ‘C Stunner glasses’ made from recycled materials, each with its own story and together creating a powerful metaphor around the way Africa is perceived by the outside world and vice versa.

Kabiru has been creating his ‘spectacles’ since childhood when he started to produce toys for his age-mates as a way of bartering his way through school work. The origins of his attachment to glasses stem from his father’s neurosis about them (in turn caused by the fact that Cyrus’s grandfather punished his father severely when, as a boy, he lost a pair of glasses that the family had made great sacrifices to provide him with). It is a universal story of poverty and the struggle to overcome it. Cyrus’s father scarred by his father’s fury when his attempts to help his son with his eyesight came to nought. The father, still mired in poverty, instilling in his son, Cyrus, a bizarre reverence for the things that he himself lost through carelessness - the son responding to this creatively - by reproducing again and again, the object of his father’s pain and his grandfather’s hope. In so doing, creating a contemporary folk tale through finding fame and fortune through his ‘glasses’ sufficient to lift him out of the poverty that his father and grandfather wished to overcome.

This is the psychological background to the C-Stunners series but the works are rich in social comment too. Each with its own story from glasses with bars that evoke the jails of Nairobi to those with spent bullets that tell their story of criminal or police brutality. Also a love for nature that fuels the artist’s desire to recycle as part of a process of protecting the environment.

Cool glasses